Jeopardy! (1963)

01.jpg
System: PC
Company: ShareData
Year: 1987
Genre: Puzzle
Theme: Based on Other Media / Multiplayer / Quiz
Language: English
Licence: Commercial

Jeopardy! (ID: 1963)

Disks:
1 x 5.25" DS DD (360kB)
Format:
Raw (.IMG)
Status:
Unverified
Language:
English
Contributor:
Moebius
SHA1 Hashes:

eec247624f5d162be129bb9e9860ec239d0d7156  disk01.img
Added: 2019-11-28
Edited: 2020-04-20

Comments (3) [Post comment]

Mr Creosote (2008-11-23):
Originally posted by Spiced at 06:22 on November 23rd, 2008:
Here is how I see the rationale behind the categories. They depend on your knowledge. If you know a lot about San Francisco and little about Victorian authors, it behooves you to make progress against your opponents there. Perhaps they also know about San Francisco, in which case you may or may not be forced to turn the game in to a key pressing competition. Of course, you still have to look at the Victorian questions, but at least do it on your terms.

Hmm.... I don't really follow the reasoning there. As I said, you're going to play all the questions anyway, so your area of expertise (and the opposite category) are going to turn up anyway. The end result of points / money is the same. Maybe I'm going at this too analytically, though - there may be a psychological aspect ("I'll never be able to catch up with this guy, he's too far ahead") for less mathematically-minded persons ;)

Quote:
Then there is the money. Let's say you got the daily double. If you got it for a question ordinarily for $100, you may feel like betting differently than if the question were for a more difficult spot.

Ah, yes, you mean those special fields? Those slipped my mind completely (they're not in the game, I think), but I seem to remember one (called 'risk'-something) where the player who picked the field would be the only one who can answer and he has to choose the sum of money to bet. Ok, as I said, I forgot about those, but that would still be solvable easily if the questions were played 'in order' without any choice: just let an 'event buzzer' kick in randomly to trigger such events and also let it pick the candidate.

Quote:
Alex Trebek is actually known to resent players picking spots out of order ($400 after $200, et cetera). I don't know if that is a rule on Jeopardy! currently. I sort of agree with him, so there is an unending source of irritation from the computer players for me.

I don't care much for the actual order of questions per se for the same reason I consider jumping around pointless - it makes no difference in the end. However, in the game, I find it very annoying, because of the interface. As you know, picking the next question is done by pushing a number key which doesn't directly correspond to the sum of money displayed on the board. As long as I'm picking the questions, I'm always going from top-left to bottom-right, so I can pretty much also press the buttons in 'correct' order (1, 2, 3, 4...). The computer players destroy this scheme by creating gaps, so when I'm picking next time, I get confused why my key press didn't result in any question being displayed... two seconds of irritation, then the realization that that question isn't there anymore and I have to pick the next one. Annoying.

Spiced (2008-11-23):
Originally posted by Mr Creosote at 17:59 on November 16th, 2008:
A thought which I couldn't fit into the review:

What's the deal with selecting the category and 'value' of the question from that wall? They're all played anyway, so the order doesn't matter at all. Pointless, pointless, pointless!

Ah, what a great choice. This is one of the few games I keep around eternally (had it a good 15 years).

Here is how I see the rationale behind the categories. They depend on your knowledge. If you know a lot about San Francisco and little about Victorian authors, it behooves you to make progress against your opponents there. Perhaps they also know about San Francisco, in which case you may or may not be forced to turn the game in to a key pressing competition. Of course, you still have to look at the Victorian questions, but at least do it on your terms.

Then there is the money. Let's say you got the daily double. If you got it for a question ordinarily for $100, you may feel like betting differently than if the question were for a more difficult spot.

Alex Trebek is actually known to resent players picking spots out of order ($400 after $200, et cetera). I don't know if that is a rule on Jeopardy! currently. I sort of agree with him, so there is an unending source of irritation from the computer players for me.

Mr Creosote (2008-11-16):

A thought which I couldn't fit into the review:

What's the deal with selecting the category and 'value' of the question from that wall? They're all played anyway, so the order doesn't matter at all. Pointless, pointless, pointless!

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