Game:

The Spam Club

» The Spam Club - Life, The Universe and Everything - Site Issues - The importance of manual scans
ReplyNew TopicNew Poll
» Multiple Pages: 12

The importance of manual scans

Vote:
Essential
Whereever possible
Case to case decision
Nice, but not important
Waste of time
Posted at 08:58 on July 13th, 2009 | Quote | Edit | Delete
Avatar
Admin
Reborn Gumby
Posts: 8988
No, the last Windows system I had ran Windows 98 (not SE), but I gave that away to a friend who desperately needed "a" computer.

Anyway, we've gone 'slightly' off-topic. I'm still looking for more opinions about the the manual issue - please don't be discouraged by this short interlude about task automation via scripting languages, everyone.
-----
Now you see the violence inherent in the system!
Posted at 09:12 on July 13th, 2009 | Quote | Edit | Delete
Avatar
Member
Master Gumby
Posts: 82
Yes, all 5 of us. :D Can't afford to go off topic with numbers like that! I picked 'case to case decision' or as I would put it 'case by case basis'.

I've only scanned one manual before, and it's not something I would want to do very often.

Maybe you can write a perl script to do it. :) Show us the true power of perl!! :D
-----
-----
Edited by Gargantuan Orangutan at 09:13 on July 13th, 2009
Posted at 09:25 on July 13th, 2009 | Quote | Edit | Delete
Avatar
Admin
Reborn Gumby
Posts: 8988
Well, at least one person who hasn't been here before has voiced an opinion - although I don't expect much, I still want to make it clear that nobody has to be discouraged just by this side-topic.

And you'll be surprised: I do have a Perl script which handles all the post-processing of the raw images, i.e. cleaning them up, reducing colour depth and so on. If you finance a pair of robot arms and hands, I'm sure I would be able to write a control script in Perl which would make them turn the pages as well ;)
-----
Now you see the violence inherent in the system!
Posted at 09:29 on July 13th, 2009 | Quote | Edit | Delete
Avatar
Member
Master Gumby
Posts: 82
I thought you might say that. :)
-----
Posted at 14:19 on July 17th, 2009 | Quote | Edit | Delete
Avatar
Member
Retired Gumby
Posts: 716
I think it mostly depends on the individual game. Is it one where the manual is essential (because not all the info you need is available in-game, or because it has one of those security things "what is the picture on page 2?", etc) or is it one of those lameass "press button a to jump, press button b to fire, use the d-pad to move around" pieces of crap?
A good example of this can be seen in atari 2600 manuals. Most are the same useless "use joystick to move, press button to fire" garbage, but a few have a list of complex game settings. (Warlords has about 16 different modes, you can choose 1-4 players, fast or slow balls, catchable balls or deflecting only balls, but the only way to know which mode is which (they're simply numbered 1-16, you don't get to choose each option seperately or anything) is by the list in the manual. Space caverns is similar, but more so. You can choose 1 or 2 players, having 2 or 4 aliens above, 0, 1, or 2 side aliens, large or small top aliens, whether the top aliens fire straigh or diagonally, and about 6 levels of difficulty. None of these are seperate options, you have to choose one of some 60 or 80 numbered modes & try to figure which one is the one you actually want, a task which is nearly impossible without the chart included in the manual.
Both of these games NEED a manual, yet for the vast majority of 2600 games, the manual is completely useless.)


Manuals are something that is generally an "eh, so what?" thing, but become very important when you want/need one & can't find it.
Your best bet would be to include manual scans, but do so with minimum effort, using ones other people have already scanned & posted somewhere (giving appropriate credit of course).
-----
At the end of the day, you're left with a bent fork & a pissed off rhino.
Posted at 17:36 on July 17th, 2009 | Quote | Edit | Delete
Avatar
Member
Dr Gumby
Posts: 192
I thought the main aim of TGoD is to preserve the games. Why just preserve the software? The Boxes and Manuals are also worth the work. Even if they are not usable to play the game. It might be a good example for future software companies how you should not write a manual. ;)
Posted at 19:31 on July 17th, 2009 | Quote | Edit | Delete
Guest
If it saves you the effort of scanning (and I've scanned a few manuals in my time so I know how tedious it can be) you may be interested to know that ReplacementDocs has a manual available for Simon the Sorcerer II - it's marked as the DOS version, but is the Amiga version of the manual that much of a difference? Also, a scan for The Clue! (Der Clou!) is in RDocs's upload queue, again it is marked for the PC but as the manual is multi-format it also covers the various Amiga versions, the problem here is how long it will take RDocs to make this scan 'live'.

Re. The Train Game, does a scan offer anything that cannot be conveyed in the text file? If not then there is little point in offering a scan, unless, as mentioned by T-Pow, the aim of the site is to preserve everything gamewise in which case you will have to offer scans of manuals for all the games.
» Multiple Pages: 12
ReplyNew TopicNew Poll
Powered by Spam Board 5.2.4 © 2007 - 2011 Spam Board Team