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Games (1314 result(s))

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Die Höhle

hoehle01.png
Eway 10 Software 2005
Genre: Adventure
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Commercial
System: C64

At last, your search could come to an end. The ancient relic, the last piece of the jigsaw puzzle which you and your colleague have been trying to decypher for years, should be right there in this cave. Go in, get it and get out again. Should be a piece of cake. If there weren't unspeakable horrors also lurking inside. Not just that, the cave is also extremely spacious, containing not just several rooms, a chapel and an underground lake, but even a number of prison cells! But alright, some space to explore is what we're looking for in such a game anyway, isn't it?


Die Höhlenwelt-Saga: Der leuchtende Kristall

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Weltenschmiede / Software 2000 1994
Genre: Adventure
Rating: 1.5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

[Mr Creosote] The "Höhlenweltsaga" (roughly: "Saga of Cave World") is the first Point & Click Adventure made by the Bavarian development studio "Weltenschmiede". Before this, they were known for their three illustrated Text Adventures: Das Stundenglas, Die Kathedrale and Hexuma. For these three games, there had been accompanying novels or at least short stories already. The same happened with Höhlenwelt: Main author Harald Evers wrote eight novels based on this world later.


Die Kathedrale

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Software 2000 1991
Genre: Adventure
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Freeware
System: PC, Amiga (OCS/ECS)

Imagine you are in the city of Schönau and you visit the St. Paul's Cathedral, meeting an old friend from your school days. The girl separates you from the group and you find a couple of old letters and because you are now late and got away unnoticed, you are both locked into the cathedral over the weekend. This is how the adventure game Die Kathedrale, which has been spruced up with graphics, begins. After studying the discovered texts, your protagonist and his friend that it is exactly this weekend that a revenge spree planned centuries ago by the architect should now take place. This architect, a Victor Paz, was an opponent of the inquisition and he supervised the construction of the cathedral. That is why he had the means to include some traps which should be triggered only centuries later.


Die Sage von Nietoom

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4th Generation Studios / Kingsoft 1995
Genre: Adventure
Rating: 2/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC
Grandfather Wando is dying. Marco primarily remembers him as a great teller of fairy tales. Though now, the old man actually claims that it is all true: the fabled land of Nietoom can be reached through a magic portal directly from this very house. Is he already delirious? No, Marco of course takes it all dead seriously and starts searching.

Die Siedler

siedler01.png
Blue Byte 1993
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Amiga

British and American games usually keep their names when they're released in Germany - even if it's a translated version. That's good, makes international conversations about them easier. German companies on the other hand sometimes take really silly measures to increase their chance on the international market. Not that it has ever worked, but giving up would be silly, too. One of the effects is that German games have English names - even here. If you can't see anything strange about that, you're probably from the USA. What would you think if a game by an 'American' company would carry a title in Suaheli? To take it one step further: what would you think if a game by a German company was released in your country carrying a German title?


Die Siedler II: Veni, Vidi, Vici

siedler201.png
Blue Byte 1996
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

So we had The Settlers… what could possibly be improved? Looking at this sequel, even in detail, apparently not a lot. The game is still about creating a functioning economy which, ideally, should be supported by efficient logistics, i.e. short/fast delivery routes connecting the main junctions. Whichever faction manages to pull this off best, i.e. gains access to most of the valuable resources and exploits them effectively, usually wins.


Die Stadt der Löwen oder The Final Singapore Sling

StadtDerLoewen01.png
PM Entertainment / Software 2000 1989
Genre: Adventure
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Amiga

Singapore, Lion City. This is where the trail leads when a Japanese business man and former general of the royal army is murdered by a prostitute in London. Investigative journalists Christine and Robert smell a story, and the game's plot follows them. However, the player takes over the role of Taiko, member of a Japanese secret society, who apparently supports the two in some way.


Die total verrückte Rallye

dtvr01.png
Blue Byte 1995
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

Whenever something claims to be 'crazy' (meaning 'funny' or 'wacky') in the title, you should be careful. It usually means the product won't be crazy at all, but rather lame. Simple reason: They try too hard, it all gets too obvious. Die total verrückte Rallye (literal translation: the totally crazy rallye) fortunately only stumbles into this trap partly, keeping the lameness factor at a bearable minimum (if only there weren't this 'announcer' with his GDR / Berlin accent...).


Digger

digger_000.png
Windmill Software 1983
Genre: Puzzle, Action
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

Digger was created by Windmill Software in 1983 and released as a copy-protected, bootable 5.25" floppy disk for the IBM PC. It was designed to work on an IBM XT/AT with a CGA adapter; it relies on the CPU for timing, so it will run too fast on newer PCs.


Dingsda

dingsda01.png
PCSL 1991
Genre: Puzzle
Rating: 1/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Amiga

Dingsda was a popular quiz show on German television running from the mid-80s to the end of the last millenium (in fact, it was only popular until the mid-90s, but it ran for another five years after that). The basic premise: two teams of TV 'celebrities' would compete in guessing words which were explained by kindergarten children.



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