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Tenth Plague

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Lynnea Dally 2011
Genre: Adventure
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Interpreter

I used to think I lived in a fairly enlightened country. Until a recent visit from the Pope: Everybody went crazy, you couldn't watch the news anymore or read a paper – and all because of an old guy in a silly robe. As quickly as the madness came over people, it also faded again. Lurking under the hood until the next occasion. Nevertheless, compared to most other countries in the world, I guess I can still count myself lucky; at least religion plays absolutely no role in daily life here. It's not a subject of public debate, nobody cares what you do or don't believe in and it almost never appears as an argument or even topic in any media publications.


Terminal Interface for Models RCM301-303

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VigiMech Corporation 2018
Genre: Adventure
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Freeware
System: Interpreter

Imagine a rather bizarre setup: An industrial mech with remote control, which still relies on having a passenger on board, whose sole purpose is tagging items for the controller at the other end of the line. Since naming things is not that overly exciting you thankfully take over the role of the controller in this game. So your task will be remote controlling the robot around a research complex, ordering it to shove things out of the way and punch the one or the other object, while listening to the comments of your on-board companion.


Terraquake

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Mike Woodroffe & Others 1985
Genre: Adventure
Rating: 2/6
Licence: Commercial
System: C64

By the power of Grayskull.... All the children in the 80s knew this catchphrase. They watched the adventures of He-Man and his friends (and foes) on TV, bought the action figures, read the comics. And of course there were several computer games for the most common systems of the time.


Terraria

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Re-Logic 2011
Genre: Action, RPG
Rating: 6/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

Imagine the beginning of a great adventure: You are standing in a forest. The sky is blue, the sun is shining and the wildlife is wandering about. There is a guy named Jack, Steve or Brat next to you, who will turn out to be an invaluable source of information, for he is The Guide. With great foresight you brought a set of tools along, so you can start right away. What will it be? Do you want to start digging, to search for valuable ores and treasure caves? Or do you want to attack that slime creature that is coming closer, in the hope that it will drop some valuables? Or how about building a base, maybe a log cabin, first? All of this is possible in Terraria, an open-world 2D platformer, that combines the fun of exploration, fighting and building in one game.


Test Drive

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Accolade 1987
Genre: Action, Simulation, Sport
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

Test Drive is both a driving simulation and an action game rolled into one package. This is one the first games I played for the IBM/PC platform in 1987. By this point I already owned a Nintendo Entertainment System, so I had become accustomed to games with full color and a 4-channel soundtrack. Nevertheless the 3-D POV aspect coupled with the authentic attempt to simulate the subtle differences between each of the vehicles made this one a winner in my estimation. At the time I received this game, the unit my family owned was an Acer/Multitech 710 PC/XT clone, with a Samsung 12” amber monochrome display. This display adapter was an ATI graphics solution plus (CGA, MDA, Hercules, Plantronics) which did a great job of determining which mono mode to use, and in this case used CGA mono (which is way better than the unfortunate purple and blue pastel patterns that the CGA mode generates on a color monitor). The screenshots I have included display both mono CGA and EGA modes, respectively. Also, this game does not look very good in Hercules so I am thankful the graphics adapter had the good sense not to use this feature.


Testament

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Insanity / APC&TCP / Islona / Signum 1997
Genre: Action
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Amiga
Sometimes, aiming low is the key. Most of the attempts at creating Doom clones on the Amiga had more or less failed. One of the best, relatively speaking, had been Gloom, clearly one of the simplest ones in many respects. Another two years later, the number of active developers on the system had dwindled even further. Testament is even more basic than Gloom. Is that a good or a bad sign?

Tetris

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Nintendo 1989
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 5.7/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Game Boy, PC (DOS)

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=Game Boy
If there is one game that has been played by almost anyone that got close to any kind of computer, it has to be Tetris. It is everywhere: From key-chains, over mobile phones, TV set-top boxes and pocket calculators to high end PCs. Think of any platform and you can be sure this game runs on it.[1] If there ever are refrigerators with Internet connections, you will certainly be able to stack some blocks while checking your milk re-order. Tetris is one of those rare games that have outgrown copyright struggles and has become a commonly shared idea, which massively contributed to its success. Still, under this myriad of clones and copies, there are some versions many people consider the definite version. Like Spectrum Holobyte's Tetris – which often is (wrongly) thought of as the first – and the probably most famous one, which we are going to talk about today: Tetris for Game Boy.


Tex Bonaventure and the Temple of the Water of Life

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Jim Warrenfeltz 2013
Genre: Adventure
Rating: 4.5/6
Licence: Freeware
System: Interpreter

[Herr M] It is time again: Equipped with the classic fedora and the good old whip in your hand, you are standing in front of an ancient temple to figure out one of mankind's best kept secrets. If you are now thinking about a well-known leather jacket salesman, I am afraid that you are mistaken: We are not talking about the escapades of Indiana Jones, but about Tex Bonaventure on the search for the water of life.


The 7th Guest

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Trilobyte 1993
Genre: Puzzle
Rating: 3/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

[Wandrell] In 1992, the European Computer Trade Show let people take a look into the future of the game industry. While most of these games would seem to be a clear evolution of what already existed, a few decided to take advantage of the new technologies creating what, for some years, would be seen as the future: CD-ROM games. And among the very first was the mind challenging The 7th Guest.


The Activision Decathlon

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Activision 1983
Genre: Action, Sport
Rating: 2/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Atari 2600

Virtual sports should be physical exercise, too! No, this is not a review of a modern-day Wii title – the idea goes back to much earlier time. The first game to famously follow this premise was Activision's Decathlon.



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