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Games - Business (84 result(s))

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Die Fugger

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The Electric Ballhaus / Bomico 1988
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: C64

Although they originally grew tremendously rich through trade, the Fugger family would not be remembered today if it weren't for the way it used its wealth: As creditors of the German royalty, their political influence went as high as the emperor himself. Just a couple of hundred years later, the then thriving home computer market encouraged many young people to learn programming and make games themselves – the age of the bedroom developer unshackled by corporate interests. The parallels should be obvious…


Die Fugger 2

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Sunflowers 1996
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

Money and political power are often closely related. The family referenced in the title is one of the best known historical examples of this phenomenon. The members of that family don't actually appear in the game, though. It takes place a few levels below that instead. On a regional level, i.e. a member state of the former 'Holy Roman Empire', the player tries to gain political influence - just like the big idols.


Die Siedler

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Blue Byte 1993
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Amiga

British and American games usually keep their names when they're released in Germany - even if it's a translated version. That's good, makes international conversations about them easier. German companies on the other hand sometimes take really silly measures to increase their chance on the international market. Not that it has ever worked, but giving up would be silly, too. One of the effects is that German games have English names - even here. If you can't see anything strange about that, you're probably from the USA. What would you think if a game by an 'American' company would carry a title in Suaheli? To take it one step further: what would you think if a game by a German company was released in your country carrying a German title?


Die Siedler II: Veni, Vidi, Vici

siedler201.png
Blue Byte 1996
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 5/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

So we had The Settlers… what could possibly be improved? Looking at this sequel, even in detail, apparently not a lot. The game is still about creating a functioning economy which, ideally, should be supported by efficient logistics, i.e. short/fast delivery routes connecting the main junctions. Whichever faction manages to pull this off best, i.e. gains access to most of the valuable resources and exploits them effectively, usually wins.


Die total verrückte Rallye

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Blue Byte 1995
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

Whenever something claims to be 'crazy' (meaning 'funny' or 'wacky') in the title, you should be careful. It usually means the product won't be crazy at all, but rather lame. Simple reason: They try too hard, it all gets too obvious. Die total verrückte Rallye (literal translation: the totally crazy rallye) fortunately only stumbles into this trap partly, keeping the lameness factor at a bearable minimum (if only there weren't this 'announcer' with his GDR / Berlin accent...).


Discovery - In the Steps of Columbus

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Impressions 1991
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: Amiga

Impressions never had the best reputation with the mainstream gamers. They mainly produced quite inaccessible (granted) strategy titles. Caesar and Cohort are maybe their widest known classic titles. The vast majority of their games completely disappeared though.


Dr. Drago's Madcap Chase

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Blue Byte 1995
Genre: Strategy
Rating: -
Licence: Commercial
System: PC
This is the English version of the German game Die total verrückte Rallye. Please refer to that version's review.

Eishockey Manager

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Software 2000 1993
Genre: Strategy, Sport
Rating: 4/6
Licence: Commercial
System: PC

Although Eishockey Manager is a game in its own it should be considered more a sideproduct of the successful Manager series by Software 2000. If you know Bundesliga Manager Professional then you'll be comfortable with this game at once because the menus are basically the same.


Elefanten!

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elefanten Schuh GmbH / WWF 1993
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 2/6
Licence: Freeware
System: Amiga

Oh, sweet childhood! Even for boys, there were ways of making shoe shopping (basically one of the most hated activities ever) into a true adventure. In one store chain, you got free comic books of Lurchi and the competition had you go on a safari (well, at least you could get a plush elephant)! It's the latter company (which has by now disappeared from the market) which is also responsible for this game: another attempt at acquiring customers in a playful way.


Energie-Manager

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Rauser / BWMi 1993
Genre: Strategy
Rating: 2/6
Licence: Freeware
System: Amiga

Just a little more than ten years ago (in 1993), there was no 'Internet' of today's proportions. Computer magazines coming with CDs full of stuff were still uncommon, too. To be exact, the first 'one-shot issues' of this kind appeared in early 1994 in Germany. So, 1993 was still a year of game demos being spread on floppy disks, and those were available on quite a few magazine covers.



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